uses of

Uses of Ask with Phrasal Verbs

Uses of Ask with Phrasal Verbs Uses of ask for, ask over, ask about, ask after, ask out, ask around, ask round, ask in.

Uses of ‘Have’

Uses of ‘Have’ Have; a drink / food a shower a look wishes a moment an event a good mood a bad fall a nap a limp a lisp a problem a fit a Go!

Uses of ‘Borrow’ and ‘Lend’

Uses of ‘Borrow’ and ‘Lend’ What are the differences between borrow and lend? Borrow; shows that something is (temporarily) taken from another person. Lend; shows that something is (temporarily) given to another person.

Uses of ‘Every day’ and ‘All day’

Uses of ‘Every day’ and ‘All day’ every day; on all days, each day. all of these days -> Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday. all day; the entire day. Beginning of the day <—> End of the day; Please follow the list;

Uses of ‘So’ and ‘Too’

Uses of ‘So’ and ‘Too’ Differences between so and too. Please follow the list; I am happy; So am I. I am happy too.

Uses of ‘Alone’, ‘Lonely’ and ‘Lone’

Uses of ‘Alone’, ‘Lonely’ and ‘Lone’ Uses and differences between alone, lonely, lone; Alone, and on your own/by yourself (which are less formal and are the normal phrases used in spoken English), describe a person or thing that is separate from others. They do not mean that the person is unhappy. Examples;

Uses of ‘There is’ and ‘There are’

Uses of ‘There is’ and ‘There are’ Uses of and differences between; “There is“ – is used with the following subjects;

Meanings and Uses of ‘Agenda’, ‘Diary’, ‘Schedule’, ‘Timetable’

Meanings and Uses of ‘Agenda’, ‘Diary’, ‘Schedule’, ‘Timetable’ Uses and differences; Agenda is a list of items to be discussed at a meeting;

Uses of ‘Mr.’, ‘Mrs.’, ‘Miss.’ and ‘Ms.’

Uses of ‘Mr.’, ‘Mrs.’, ‘Miss.’ and ‘Ms.’ Mr.; usually used with a man’s last name. Mrs.; usually used with a woman’s last name. Miss.; usually used with a woman’s last name. Ms.; usually with a a woman’s last name.

Uses of ‘Also’, ‘As well’ and ‘Too’ (With Differences)

Uses of ‘Also’, ‘As well’ and ‘Too’ (With Differences) Also is more formal than as well and too, and it usually comes before the main verb or after be: – I went to New York last year, and I also spent some time in Washington. In British English it is not usually used at the end