differences

Gerund and Infinitive in English

Gerund and Infinitive in English A gerund is a verb in its ing (present participle) form that functions as a noun that names an activity rather than a person or thing. Any action verb can be made into a gerund. Follow the list for detailed expressions, examples about gerund and infitive.

Comparatives and Superlatives

Comparatives and Superlatives Comparative list, long adjectives, shor adjectives, superlative list. Follow the list for detailed expressions;

Present Perfect Tense vs Past Simple Tense

Present Perfect Tense vs Past Simple Tense Using, examples and differences between present perfect tense and past simple tense; Follow the list for detailed expressions;

Difference Between ALL, EVERY, EACH

Difference Between ALL, EVERY, EACH All -> total, Every -> collectively, Each -> one by one. Follow the detailed expressions and example sentences;

Ways to Say BUT

Ways to Say BUT However, despite, in spite of this / despite this, although, in fact, but the fact remains that. Follow the list examples;

Watch, See, Look – Using Verbs

Watch, See, Look – Using Verbs Watch; we watch moving & changing images, with long concentration. See; when images enter your eyes without a lot of effort from us. Loot at; You direct your eyes at something and etc…

Despite vs Although – Detailed Expression

Differences Between “Despite” and “Although” – Detailed Expression Despite and Although are both used to contrast two things – the difference is in the structure of the sentences;

Will or Going To?

Will or Going To? There are two additional ways to talk about the future in English: will/won’t and going to.

Present Continuous For Future Use

Present Continuous For Future Use Talking about the future in English Many students use only will or going to in order to talk about the future. However, it’s very common to use the present continuous to talk about the future, in the case of arrangements that are planned:

Present Perfect or Past Simple Tense

Present Perfect or Past Simple Tense Use the present perfect to talk about a general experience in the past. Use the past simple to talk about a specific moment in the past.